“President Donald J. Trump Signed Executive Order– Grants of Clemency to Commute The Sentences of Five Citizens”

 

WASHINGTON, D.C.–today, President Donald J. Trump signed Executive Grants of Clemency to commute the sentences of the following individuals: Lenora Logan, Rashella Reed, Charles Tanner, John Bolen, and Curtis McDonald.

Lenora Logan turned her life around after she was sentenced to 27 years in prison for her role in a cocaine conspiracy.  During her time in prison, she heroically came to the aid of a Bureau of Prisons nurse who was under vicious assault by an unstable inmate.  Without regard for her own safety, Ms. Logan immediately intervened and protected the life of the nurse.  This heroic act is but one example of Ms. Logan’s selfless acts since forging a better path for her life.  While incarcerated, Ms. Logan served as a suicide watch companion, a nursing assistant for those in hospice care, and a leader of the praise and worship team.  After serving approximately 20 years in prison, Ms. Logan, a mother and grandmother, was awarded compassionate release from the Bureau of Prisons.  Ms. Logan expresses regret for her past actions, exemplifies successful rehabilitation, and embodies the spirit of second chances.

Rashella Reed was a former Atlanta Public School teacher before her involvement in a public benefits fraud scheme.  She was sentenced to 14 years in prison after her convictions for wire fraud and money laundering.  While in prison, Ms. Reed used her teaching background to tutor inmates and facilitate children’s programs at the prison.  Ms. Reed is a model inmate, and many attest to her innate ability to encourage and uplift others despite her circumstances.  Ms. Reed accepts full responsibility for her actions and seeks to continue to make a difference in the lives of others.  After serving more than 6 years in prison, Ms. Reed was released on home confinement where she enjoys strong community and family support.

Charles Tanner was a young professional boxer with a promising career who sadly became involved in a drug conspiracy.  At the age of 24, he was arrested, tried, and initially sentenced to life in prison, which was later reduced to 30 years.  It was his first conviction of any kind.  He has served 16 years in prison.  Although Mr. Tanner began incarceration under a life sentence, he immediately worked to better himself by enrolling in educational courses.  To date, Mr. Tanner has completed hundreds of hours of educational programming, including an 18-month re-entry program that requires recommendation from staff and approval from the Warden for participation.  Mr. Tanner accepts responsibility and expresses remorse for his past actions.  Letters from his friends and family describe him as a respectful man of faith who exhibits positivity and works hard.

John Bolen was a small business owner who used his boat to transport cocaine from the Bahamas to Florida.  After a jury trial, he was sentenced to life imprisonment.  It was his first conviction of any kind, and Mr. Bolen has no documented history of violence.  He has served more than 13 years in prison without incident.  He has completed more than 1,300 hours of educational programming and vocational training, multiple re-entry programs, and has served as both a suicide companion and a mental health companion.  Mr. Bolen expresses “deep regret and shame” for his mistakes.  Several Bureau of Prison officials who have supervised Mr. Bolen describe him as a “model inmate,” a “regular hard working blue collar guy who simply stumbled along life’s path and made a mistake,” and someone who “displays dedication” in assisting others.

Curtis McDonald was convicted in 1996 for drug trafficking and money laundering and is now 70 years old.  After a jury trial, he was sentenced to life in prison.  He was a first-time offender who has now served nearly 24 years in prison and has an excellent record of good conduct.  Mr. McDonald has made productive use of his time in prison, maintaining employment with good job evaluations, and has completed numerous education courses.  Mr. McDonald has also served as a mentor in the Mentors for Life program.  He acknowledges that “the law is the law and I broke it” and attests that he is “not the same man I was walking through these doors” decades ago.  Mr. McDonald vows that despite his life sentence, he has been determined to “take advantage of every opportunity to help myself grow . . . so that I may be of use to those who want and need it.”

In light of the decisions these individuals have made following their convictions to improve their lives and the lives of others while incarcerated, the President has determined that each is deserving of an Executive Grant of Clemency.

Source:White House Press Secretary

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